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Thursday, June 17, 2021

What if it happened like this in the U.S.?

 We have had a good many people to write us and ask us what in the world is going on in Nicaragua as they read all the international reporting. This is our attempt at trying to put the recent arrests in a way that people living in the United States might better understand.  We are finding that if we do comparisons, that other people can maybe get a feeling of what this little nation that we love so much is doing.

First let us explain some before we get to the comparisons between Nicaragua and the U.S.

1.  USAID and other U.S. government entities have sent astronomical sums of money to NGOs in Nicaragua, a poor country of only 6.5 million people. A comparison of the wealth of the two countries makes the figures even more outrageous. Nicaragua’s GDP is around $12 billion, while the GDP of the US is around $21 trillion—that makes the U.S. economy more than 1,750 times larger than Nicaragua’s. We multiplied the figures of money sent to Nicaragua by 1,750 to show what an equivalent sum would mean in the U.S. in the comparisons below.

2.  When we compare populations we have adjusted this way... Nicaragua has 6.5 million people, the U.S. has 331 million. Nicaragua's population is only 1.9% of that of the U.S., so our numbers below have been adjusted proportionately. (Source: https://afgj.org/u-s-cries-foul-because-nicaragua-stops-it-from-buying-this-years-elections)

What if Russia sent $281 billion to U.S. non-governmental organizations?

That is the equivalent - adjusting for the country's GDP - of what has happened in Nicaragua since 2015. USAID has sent $160,586,742 to Nicaraguan NGOs mainly for “independent media” and “democracy and citizenship training for youth.” 

What if Russia put $17.5 billion into Fox News, Breitbart and Infowars?  

That is the equivalent of what has happened in Nicaragua since 2009. USAID has spent at least $10 million on opposition media outlets for "media strengthening programs." Many of these outlets are extremely well-funded fringe operations with no more journalistic integrity than Alex Jones.

What if, instead of just one day, the January 6th attack on the Capitol, had stretched to months of daily violent protests, and the insurrectionists had set up road blocks effectively paralyzing the country, leading to the loss of 6.2 million jobs? What if we later found out the insurrectionists had been funded by China?

In 2018 Nicaragua went through a similar scenario when opposition protests turned violent, then armed groups set up roadblocks throughout the country that became epicenters of violence, including torture and murder. The roadblocks crippled the economy and caused the loss of 130,000 jobs, which was catastrophic for Nicaragua. The opposition and its media apparatus blamed the government for the violence but police and Sandinistas were targeted and attacked, and now investigations are showing who was funding this violence in Nicaragua – the U.S. government.

What if the Q-Anon Shaman were let out on a general amnesty for all those involved in the January 6th insurrection at the Capitol, then he declared he wanted to be President of the United States and travelled to China to openly lobby its government to put economic sanctions on the U.S. and was arrested for treason on his return? Would the headlines read "Biden Regime Arrests Presidential Candidate?"

This is essentially what is happening in Nicaragua. On June 8, Felix Maradiaga was charged with violating the laws against treason and arrested. “Maradiaga, a Harvard-educated Aspen Fellow who is a long-time recipient of NED funds through his own NGO, became notorious during the 2018 coup attempt as one of the masterminds of the violence. He benefited from the amnesty granted by the government in 2019 to all those involved in crimes related to the 2018 violence, and since then he has been traveling to the U.S. and international organizations, openly advocating for sanctions to be imposed on his country.” (Source: Rita Jill Clark-Gollub)

What if the Trump Foundation had received $12.3 billion from Russia?* What if, when asked how that money had been spent, Eric Trump refused to provide an accounting of the funds, announced the closure of the Foundation, transferred remaining Foundation funds into his personal bank account, declared he wanted to be President of the United States and when charged with money laundering, he disputed that by saying the Trump Foundation had already been audited by Russia and they found no malfeasance? 

This is what has happened in Nicaragua.  Cristiana Chamorro, daughter of former President Violeta Chamorro and Director of the Chamorro Foundation, has been charged with money laundering and placed under house arrest after refusing to account for the at least $7 million the Foundation received from U.S. government bodies in recent years which was allegedly channeled to opposition media outlets. Chamorro has been accused of transferring funds from the Foundation account into her personal bank account. She disputed the charges against her with this statement, “The US State Department rejected the charges of money laundering against the Violeta Barrios de Chamorro Foundation based on audits they conducted that did not find evidence of money laundering or diversion of funds.”

But what is the current situation really like for average Nicaraguans? Let's keep the comparisons going for better understanding.

 What if free health care were a right for every U.S. citizen? It is for every Nicaraguan, from general care, chronic and specialized care, medicines, exams, kidney dialysis and cancer treatment.

What if only 23,170 people in the U.S. had died from COVID? That's 7 per 100,000 people, the number that have died in Nicaragua, according to a new study by U.S.-based Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation that calculates COVID deaths adjusting for "excess" deaths. 

What if every U.S. citizen had the right to a free education from preschool all the way through college and graduate school? Every Nicaraguan has that right.

What if every U.S. worker was given one month’s paid vacation, 13 paid holidays, an extra month's pay each year, and pregnant women were mandated two months of paid maternity leave? Every Nicaraguan worker has these rights.


What if 50% of all candidates for public office in the U.S. were women?
 Nicaraguan law requires it. In fact, Nicaragua ranks 5th overall in the world for gender equality, 1st in women heading government ministries3rd in the world for political participation of women, and first out of 153 countries for educational attainment and health and survival(Source: World Economic Forum and UN Women)

What if the U.S. deeded all lands west of the Rockies to First Nations? In recent years the Nicaraguan government has titled a full one-third of its territory to 300 Indigenous communities to be communally owned and managed.

What if 80% of the US population received a government subsidy to cover 45% of their electrical bill? 80% of Nicaraguans do.

What if 84% of the electricity the U.S. produced were renewable? 84% of Nicaragua's energy production is renewable.

What if 26.5 million U.S. citizens were given title to houses or land? In Nicaragua half a million people have been titled land or homes since 2007, either new to them or family land that had lacked legal title.

What if police forces in the U.S. were demilitarized and trained in a community policing model? Nicaragua's largely unarmed police force works with young people to promote a culture of peace which includes home visits to at-risk youth, community counseling sessions, organizing and running sports programs, teaching vocational classes, technical training, GED programs and even financing start-up businesses together with at risk youth.

These phenomenal improvements to quality of life are the reasons that Nicaraguans support the government – a recent poll showed that 77% of the population believe the Sandinista government is working for the good of the general population of Nicaragua. But the U. S. government is committed to overthrowing the will of the people – as we know from a leaked U.S. State Department paper (RAIN), which laid out how the U. S. government would fund NGOs and opposition leaders to overthrow, how they would use gangs to disrupt the peace and safety of the citizenry, and how they would declare the election a fraud, among other distasteful actions.

The last 150 years of Nicaraguan history is filled with examples of the U. S. interfering in Nicaragua's affairs.  It continues. 

We do not believe that the U. S. government would stand by and do nothing if it were Russia or China doing the same thing to them. Do you?

  – Kathleen Murdock &
Becca Mohally Renk
Jubilee House Community

NOTE: If you are reading this blog using the mobile version, click on "web version" to see the full blog with all the features including "subscribe to blog by email".  

Please join us and also share on your social media.

Donate here to the ongoing work of the CDCA with the poor in Nicaragua:


Wednesday, June 16, 2021

What if it happened like this in the U.S.?

We have had a good many people to write us and ask us what in the world is going on in Nicaragua as they read all the international reporting. This is our attempt at trying to put the recent arrests in a way that people living in the United States might better understand.  We are finding that if we do comparisons, that other people can maybe get a feeling of what this little nation that we love so much is doing.

First let us explain some before we get to the comparisons between Nicaragua and the U.S.

1.  USAID and other U.S. government entities have sent astronomical sums of money to NGOs in Nicaragua, a poor country of only 6.5 million people. A comparison of the wealth of the two countries makes the figures even more outrageous. Nicaragua’s GDP is around $12 billion, while the GDP of the US is around $21 trillion—that makes the U.S. economy more than 1,750 times larger than Nicaragua’s. We multiplied the figures of money sent to Nicaragua by 1,750 to show what an equivalent sum would mean in the U.S. in the comparisons below.

2.  When we compare populations we have adjusted this way... Nicaragua has 6.5 million people, the U.S. has 331 million. Nicaragua's population is only 1.9% of that of the U.S., so our numbers below have been adjusted proportionately. (Source: https://afgj.org/u-s-cries-foul-because-nicaragua-stops-it-from-buying-this-years-elections)

What if Russia sent $281 billion to U.S. non-governmental organizations?

That is the equivalent - adjusting for the country's GDP - of what has happened in Nicaragua since 2015. USAID has sent $160,586,742 to Nicaraguan NGOs mainly for “independent media” and “democracy and citizenship training for youth.” 

What if Russia put $17.5 billion into Fox News, Breitbart and Infowars?  

That is the equivalent of what has happened in Nicaragua since 2009. USAID has spent at least $10 million on opposition media outlets for "media strengthening programs." Many of these outlets are extremely well-funded fringe operations with no more journalistic integrity than Alex Jones.

What if, instead of just one day, the January 6th attack on the Capitol, had stretched to months of daily violent protests, and the insurrectionists had set up road blocks effectively paralyzing the country, leading to the loss of 6.2 million jobs? What if we later found out the insurrectionists had been funded by China?

In 2018 Nicaragua went through a similar scenario when opposition protests turned violent, then armed groups set up roadblocks throughout the country that became epicenters of violence, including torture and murder. The roadblocks crippled the economy and caused the loss of 130,000 jobs, which was catastrophic for Nicaragua. The opposition and its media apparatus blamed the government for the violence but police and Sandinistas were targeted and attacked, and now investigations are showing who was funding this violence in Nicaragua – the U.S. government.

What if the Q-Anon Shaman were let out on a general amnesty for all those involved in the January 6th insurrection at the Capitol, then he declared he wanted to be President of the United States and travelled to China to openly lobby its government to put economic sanctions on the U.S. and was arrested for treason on his return? Would the headlines read "Biden Regime Arrests Presidential Candidate?"

This is essentially what is happening in Nicaragua. On June 8, Felix Maradiaga was charged with violating the laws against treason and arrested. “Maradiaga, a Harvard-educated Aspen Fellow who is a long-time recipient of NED funds through his own NGO, became notorious during the 2018 coup attempt as one of the masterminds of the violence. He benefited from the amnesty granted by the government in 2019 to all those involved in crimes related to the 2018 violence, and since then he has been traveling to the U.S. and international organizations, openly advocating for sanctions to be imposed on his country.” (Source: Rita Jill Clark-Gollub)

What if the Trump Foundation had received $12.3 billion from Russia?* What if, when asked how that money had been spent, Eric Trump refused to provide an accounting of the funds, announced the closure of the Foundation, transferred remaining Foundation funds into his personal bank account, declared he wanted to be President of the United States and when charged with money laundering, he disputed that by saying the Trump Foundation had already been audited by Russia and they found no malfeasance? 

This is what has happened in Nicaragua.  Cristiana Chamorro, daughter of former President Violeta Chamorro and Director of the Chamorro Foundation, has been charged with money laundering and placed under house arrest after refusing to account for the at least $7 million the Foundation received from U.S. government bodies in recent years which was allegedly channeled to opposition media outlets. Chamorro has been accused of transferring funds from the Foundation account into her personal bank account. She disputed the charges against her with this statement, “The US State Department rejected the charges of money laundering against the Violeta Barrios de Chamorro Foundation based on audits they conducted that did not find evidence of money laundering or diversion of funds.”

But what is the current situation really like for average Nicaraguans? Let's keep the comparisons going for better understanding.

 What if free health care were a right for every U.S. citizen? It is for every Nicaraguan, from general care, chronic and specialized care, medicines, exams, kidney dialysis and cancer treatment.

What if only 23,170 people in the U.S. had died from COVID? That's 7 per 100,000 people, the number that have died in Nicaragua, according to a new study by U.S.-based Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation that calculates COVID deaths adjusting for "excess" deaths. 

What if every U.S. citizen had the right to a free education from preschool all the way through college and graduate school? Every Nicaraguan has that right.

What if every U.S. worker was given one month’s paid vacation, 13 paid holidays, an extra month's pay each year, and pregnant women were mandated two months of paid maternity leave? Every Nicaraguan worker has these rights.


What if 50% of all candidates for public office in the U.S. were women?
Nicaraguan law requires it. In fact, Nicaragua ranks 5th overall in the world for gender equality, 1st in women heading government ministries, 3rd in the world for political participation of women, and first out of 153 countries for educational attainment and health and survival. (Source: World Economic Forum and UN Women)

What if the U.S. deeded all lands west of the Rockies to First Nations? In recent years the Nicaraguan government has titled a full one-third of its territory to 300 Indigenous communities to be communally owned and managed.

What if 80% of the US population received a government subsidy to cover 45% of their electrical bill? 80% of Nicaraguans do.

What if 84% of the electricity the U.S. produced were renewable? 84% of Nicaragua's energy production is renewable.

What if 26.5 million U.S. citizens were given title to houses or land? In Nicaragua half a million people have been titled land or homes since 2007, either new to them or family land that had lacked legal title.

What if police forces in the U.S. were demilitarized and trained in a community policing model? Nicaragua's largely unarmed police force works with young people to promote a culture of peace which includes home visits to at-risk youth, community counseling sessions, organizing and running sports programs, teaching vocational classes, technical training, GED programs and even financing start-up businesses together with at risk youth.

These phenomenal improvements to quality of life are the reasons that Nicaraguans support the government – a recent poll showed that 77% of the population believe the Sandinista government is working for the good of the general population of Nicaragua. But the U. S. government is committed to overthrowing the will of the people – as we know from a leaked U.S. State Department paper (RAIN), which laid out how the U. S. government would fund NGOs and opposition leaders to overthrow, how they would use gangs to disrupt the peace and safety of the citizenry, and how they would declare the election a fraud, among other distasteful actions.

The last 150 years of Nicaraguan history is filled with examples of the U. S. interfering in Nicaragua's affairs.  It continues. 

We do not believe that the U. S. government would stand by and do nothing if it were Russia or China doing the same thing to them. Do you?

 – Kathleen Murdock &
Becca Mohally Renk
Jubilee House Community

NOTE: If you are reading this blog using the mobile version, click on "web version" to see the full blog with all the features including "subscribe to blog by email".  

Please join us and also share on your social media.

Donate here to the ongoing work of the CDCA with the poor in Nicaragua:


Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Vaccines and Sloppy Journalism

[Español abajo] (Saturday,10 April) As I write this, we, the Old Farts, are sitting at the women’s public hospital in Managua waiting to see if we keel over after getting our first COVID-19 vaccine. We are so excited and thrilled... not only did it go well... it was easy, organized, and safe. Every person attending us was friendly, kind, and very efficient.

A friend called us this morning and told us that the lines for vaccines had gone down and for us to head over and so we did.

First vaccination for the Old Farts

We got the AstraZeneca vaccine .The Nicaraguan government first vaccinated all the seriously at-risk people... People with kidney failure and on dialysis, people undergoing cancer treatments, etc. with the Sputnik vaccine.   Now the targeted population are those over 60 years of age.

Earlier in the week, I read an article in The Guardian that a friend had told me about and was appalled by what I read. The article certainly did not reflect what I have experienced in Nicaragua as we live here and have weathered the pandemic.

Nicaragua has had low numbers of cases... Why?
    1. Almost all businesses and government buildings that are enclosed require masks, alcohol for cleaning hands and shopping carts, and temperatures are taken before entering.
    2. The population of Nicaragua is young compared to... say... the U. S. A.
    3. Most houses are opened to the air. In regard to many other nations, most Nicaraguans do not have air conditioning.
    4. At the beginning of the pandemic, health workers went house to house explaining about the virus and how to protect yourself and family - they made nearly 5 million home visits.
    5. Despite what The Guardian said, there have not been mass demonstrations. The normally huge gathering in the Plaza on the 19th of July last year was instead broadcast virtually, and people were encouraged to celebrate at home with the slogan "every house is a Plaza."

Nicaragua has had limited testing like most of the world, but when Becca thought she might have COVID, she was tested. Read her blog about getting tested.

As in every country, there probably have been more deaths due to COVID-19 than are reported, but absolutely nothing like what The Guardian reported. Why do I think that? Because we run a health clinic that has its fingers on the pulse of a crowded and poverty-stricken community. Our Nueva Vida Clinic staff has only seen a few deaths that could have had the virus as a contributing factor along with diabetes, hypertension, and kidney failure.

The Center for Disease Control reports that deaths in the U.S. due to Covid-19 are likely to be 35% higher than has been reported.  Many people everywhere decide not to go get medical care.

So why is the Nicaraguan government getting such bad press regarding health care? 

Republican strategist Karl Rove includes in his playbook how to win using the strategy of attacking an opponent's strength. "It is simple: In a political environment where perception often trumps policy, mount early challenges to your opponent's strongest attributes to raise questions and create an alternative image in the minds of voters."

Among the many achievements of the Sandinista government over the last 15 years, health care - including the successful response to COVID - is one of this government's greatest achievements.  So why would a news media known for being left-leaning report such erroneous information?

Well, when I asked our Community members on our front porch, Becca said, "sloppy reporting.  They take information from someone that they trust and never check the sources."

When it comes to Nicaragua, this is what we see all the way from PBS/NPR to Democracy Now to The Guardian...  they have people they trust within a country and never come to Nicaragua to ask the people themselves or see with their own eyes.  Sloppy journalism indeed.

And such sloppy work plays right into the Karl Rove handbook which - I think - should appall their editors.

-Kathleen

[English above] (Sábado 10 de abril) Mientras escribo esto, nosotros, los Viejos, estamos sentados en el hospital público dedicado a la salud de la mujer en Managua esperando a ver si nos derrumbamos después de recibir nuestra primera vacuna COVID-19. Estamos muy emocionados ... no solo salió bien todo pero fue fácil, organizado y seguro. Todas las personas que nos atendieron fueron amables y muy eficientes.

Un amigo nos llamó esta mañana y nos dijo que las filas para las vacunas se habían reducido y que nos dirigiéramos al hospital y así lo hicimos en carrera.

Primera vacuna para nosotros los Viejos

Recibimos la vacuna AstraZeneca. El gobierno nicaragüense primero vacunó a todas las personas en grave riesgo ... Personas con insuficiencia renal y en diálisis, personas en tratamiento contra el cáncer, etc. con la vacuna Sputnik. Ahora la población objetivo es los mayores de 60 años.

A principios de semana, leí un artículo en The Guardian del que me había hablado un amigo y estaba consternada por lo que leí. El artículo ciertamente no refleja lo que he experimentado en Nicaragua, nosotros que vivimos aquí y hemos vivido la pandemia aqui.

Nicaragua ha tenido pocos casos de COVID-19 ... ¿Por qué?
    1. Casi todas las empresas y edificios gubernamentales que están cerrados requieren mascarillas, alcohol para lavarse las manos y los carritos de compras, y se toman las temperaturas antes de ingresar.
    2. La población de Nicaragua es joven en comparación con ... digamos ... los EE. UU.
    3. La mayoría de las casas están abiertas al aire. Con respecto a muchas otras naciones, la mayoría de los nicaragüenses no tiene aire acondicionado.
    4. Al comienzo de la pandemia, los trabajadores de la salud iban de casa en casa explicando sobre el virus y cómo protegerse y proteger a su familia; hicieron casi 5 millones de visitas domiciliarias.
    5. A pesar de lo que dijo The Guardian, no ha habido manifestaciones masivas. En cambio, la gran celebracion en la Plaza el 19 de julio del año pasado se transmitió virtualmente y se animó a la gente a celebrar en casa con el lema "cada casa es una plaza".

Nicaragua ha tenido pruebas limitadas como la mayoría de los paises del mundo, pero cuando Becca pensó que podría tener COVID, le hicieron la prueba. Lea su blog sobre la experiencia de hacerse la prueba.

Como en todos los países, probablemente ha habido más muertes por COVID-19 de las que se informan, pero absolutamente nada como lo que informó The Guardian. ¿Por qué pienso eso? Porque manejamos una clínica de salud que tiene en sus dedos el pulso de una comunidad abarrotada y golpeada por la pobreza. Nuestro personal de la Clínica Nueva Vida solo ha visto algunas muertes que podrían haber tenido el virus como un factor contribuyente junto con la diabetes, la hipertensión y la insuficiencia renal.

El Centro para el Control de Enfermedades informa que es probable que las muertes en los EE. UU. debidas a Covid-19 sean un 35% más altas de lo que se ha informado oficialmente. Muchas personas en todas partes deciden no ir a buscar atención médica.

Entonces, ¿por qué el gobierno de Nicaragua está recibiendo tan mala fama en la prensa con respecto a la atención médica?


Entre los muchos logros del gobierno sandinista en los últimos 15 años, la atención médica, incluida la respuesta exitosa al COVID, es uno de los mayores logros de este gobierno. Entonces, ¿por qué un medio noticioso conocido por su tendencia a la izquierda reportaría información tan errónea?

Bueno, cuando les pregunté a los miembros de nuestra comunidad en nuestro porche, Becca dijo: "informes descuidados. Toman información de alguien en quien confían y nunca verifican las fuentes".

Cuando se trata de Nicaragua, esto es lo que vemos desde PBS / NPR hasta Democracy Now y The Guardian ... tienen personas en las que confían dentro de un país y nunca vienen a Nicaragua para preguntarle a la gente o ver con sus propios ojos. De hecho, periodismo descuidado.

Y un trabajo tan descuidado encaja perfectamente en el manual de Karl Rove que, creo, debería horrorizar a sus editores.

-Kathleen

NOTE: If you are reading this blog using the mobile version,click on "web version" to see the full blog with all the features including "subscribe to blog by email".  

Please join us and also share on your social media.

Donate here to the ongoing work of the CDCA with the poor in Nicaragua:




Saturday, April 10, 2021

Is It Normal? ... Really?

We learned yesterday (Thursday) that five people were murdered in Rock Hill:  an A/C repair man, a prominent doctor, his wife, and their two grandchildren. They were killed by a professional football player who committed suicide today as police surrounded his house.  Mike and Sarah went to college with the grandparents, Barbara and Robert Lesslie, and Mama went to church with them.

Within just the past six months we have known two sets of murdered families or known their families.  The other was our dear friend, Jenny's, sister and her husband by the hands of his father, who then killed himself while the sister's child hid and survived.

Mass shootings or even multiple or single shootings in the United States have long ago gotten to be the norm.  But it is not normal...  not for Jenny's whole family and especially the son who survived - they are dealing with trauma and loss.

Not for the Lesslie's son... He has lost his parents and his precious young ones in one horrid act.  Their church has lost loyal members and their friends and other family members have not only lost their loved ones but now are living with the trauma of violent murders.

With the murder of Jenny's sister and husband, they knew their killer.  Can you imagine the horror of having your own father shoot your wife and you?

With the Lesslie's murders, can you imagine the helplessness of knowing you can't protect your grandchildren?  Or just working a routine service call and suddenly facing someone with a gun?

Besides the death... The terror is overwhelming.

My sister-in-law's family member teaches with the football player's mother... She is a good teacher I was told.  Can you imagine having to not only have to cope with the suicide of your child but also that he took five people's lives including those of two small children?

It is tragic from every angle from which one might choose to view these murders.  And most definitely these acts of violence should not be normal.  Never.

And yet...

The shock is not serious enough to force action against the ease in which guns can be purchased.    I don't know how one can get the U. S. government to ignore the money and legislate on behalf of their citizens... to protect them.  More U.S. citizens have been killed in the last 50 years by guns than U.S. soldiers in all the wars and non-wars (i.e. conflicts like Vietnam) combined that the US has ever been in (https://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/las-vegas-shooting/more-americans-killed-guns-1968-all-u-s-wars-combined-n807156).

In the US we have the highest number of guns owned... 120.5 per 100 people.  The next highest is Yemen with 52.8 per 100 people.  (https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-41488081).

Globally, in just 2021, the U. S. ranks 7th in the number of deaths by guns (per 100,000 people) (https://worldpopulationreview.com/country-rankings/gun-deaths-by-country).  




Japan has the lowest number of deaths with their strict gun laws.  Honduras has the highest with 60 per 100,000, third is El Salvador with 45, and fourth is Guatemala with 35.  Note: these are the nations that the immigrants who are flooding the US borders are coming from.

The U. S. goes to war and bombs to protect our so-call freedoms and interests but will not legislate to protect the freedoms, interests, and lives of Jenny's sister or the Lesslies.

In the U.S., shootings are normal events to cope with... along with COVID-19 deaths, school drills for shootings (held like fire drills), mental illness, and prisons over-flowing with the mentally ill and drug offenders.

Take it from someone who lives in a different country, none of these are normal.  Those who live in the US should not have to choose to live with this.

And yet...

- Kathleen

NOTE: If you are reading this blog using the mobile version,click on "web version" to see the full blog with all the features including "subscribe to blog by email".  

Please join us and also share on your social media.

Donate here to the ongoing work of the CDCA with the poor in Nicaragua:


Thursday, February 25, 2021

Future Fridays: The. Most. Pressing. Issue.

This Future Friday, let me tell you about our family endeavor.  I've been writing about solar panels for the CDCA and the clinic...well, the Woodocks (Woodard/Murdock) have joined this parade.

Coury Joseph Jessica Tiff Daniel - New Year's Eve - 2014/12/31

Coury and Cassie (living in California) donated early on.  Daniel and Mike (living here) have been negotiating with the solar company to get good prices and specs for the installations.

Tiff and Liz (living in Texas) are matching gifts given to the project in honor of their wedding that happened in July 2020...instead of friends and family joining them here for their celebration in December 2020...COVID...sigh.  Here is the link if you do Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/donate/784271735768302/?fundraiser_source=external_url 

Joseph and Alex (living in New Jersey) are sending out thank you letters for us for the donations.

And Jessica (living in Massachusetts) has an art "channel" on YouTube and is auctioning a painting she did of a Nicaraguan scene.  You can see the video of her painting as she explains HOW climate change is affecting Nicaragua.  It is about 2 and 1/2 minutes long.   Here is the link.  https://youtu.be/7_6zLliBpr8 

It warms our parental hearts to have all the kids involved, but not surprising.... Some own their own homes, have solar panels, one has an electric car, and all the family knows that climate change is THE. MOST. PRESSING.  ISSUE.

Helen Yuill wrote in the the February 11th NicaNotes...

In the lead up to COP26 [the 26th meeting in Nov. 2021 of the Conference of the Parties to the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change], the Nicaraguan representative Dr Paul Oquist, argues that the high level of social and economic destruction caused by Covid-19 and its impact on humanity will be ‘small, transient and recoverable’ compared with the potential total, irreversible destruction of the climate crisis.". https://afgj.org/nicanotes-nicaragua-cop26-climate-justice-and-reparations 

know it is hard to imagine something worse coming down the pike, but we have to.  We must imagine, work, and throw money, brain power, energy, and political will at climate change.   

IT. IS. THE. MOST. PRESSING. ISSUE.

- Kathleen

NOTE: If you are reading this blog using the mobile version,click on "web version" to see the full blog with all the features including "subscribe to blog by email".  

Please join us and also share on your social media.

Donate here to the ongoing work of the CDCA with the poor in Nicaragua: